New research suggests that psilocybin-assisted therapy may lead to “God moments” that can have surprising upside for people struggling with addiction.

It’d been two weeks since Jack’s last drink.

When the researchers had asked him to quit on the spot, Jack wasn’t sure he’d make it—at his peak, the 26-year-old drank 30 to 40 beers a day, enough to put him in the 95th percentile for alcohol consumption.

He knew he had a problem. He’d tried AA. Rehab, too. He’d even taken Antabuse, a prescription drug that induces nausea when combined with alcohol. By the time he’d signed up for the study, it was, as he put it, “out of desperation.” Jack listened as the researchers explained again what he needed to do—hardly believing their instructions. Then he reclined on the large suede sofa, reached for the pair of headphones on the table next to him, and clamped them over his ears. The ambient music swelled. He tugged the eyeshade across his face, took a deep breath, and slipped the 25-milligram psilocybin capsule under his tongue.

Read from original article

People with Addiction Are Tripping on Shrooms to Find God and Get Sober

People with Addiction Are Tripping on Shrooms to Find God and Get Sober